PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

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PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby glnc222 » July 14th, 2016, 1:30 am

An additional side bumper is added wired to the existing bumper switches. This may prevent some traps caused by turning into furniture legs behind the front bumper. It will take many runs to see how much it helps.
The method used is removable and requires no holes or cuts in the housing.

[edit] To prevent furniture leg traps the wheel extension must also be limited. See below Tilt Reduction Mod http://www.robotreviews.com/chat/viewtopic.php?p=138691#p138691
These traps from lifting the side in a wheelie happen faster than the response to the bumper switch.

[edit] The new 9350 Turbo model has counter weights added in the front to likely correct this problem.

I observed the Powerbot getting trapped on a lamp base which normally engages the bumper twice in four runs, after dozens without incident. The trap occurred by side swiping in a turn onto the lamp contacted behind the front bumper. Scratches on the side indicate there has been contact with that part of the housing over the many cleaning runs.
[edit] The side bumper mod was built before the tilt mod farther below, so whether that tilt correction alone might have solved the lamp problem is not known. The lamp could also have been raised higher as a practical matter.

BumperX14.JPG
like cat in a tree


The Powerbot has only two bumper switches, one on each side responding to both front and side impacts using a mechanism with lever micro switches. This may limit the software responses. A frontal hit is probably detected through simultaneous closing of both switches.

BumperX6.JPG


(apologies to European users as English measurements given; easy enough to translate to metric)

The extra bumper is made of plastic from wall corner guards in hardware stores (3/4 in. from Ace Hardware $3 here; wider ones available. Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Trimaco-1834-Residential-Corner-8-Feet/dp/B00G0Q6A20/ref=pd_sim_sbs_60_6?ie=UTF8&dpID=31LG3a3TTdL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR160%2C160_&psc=1&refRID=11X08BBDMBMP8ZPKM9D3). Transparent clear types assist with assembly.

[edit] The Trimaco brand used was vinyl plastic, cheaper. The Lexan ones might be too brittle to bend, not tried.

The plastic is attached to the buttons with double sided foam tape (see details below) 1mm thick, to flat button tactile switches 12mm wide 4.3mm thick. e.g. TE FSM100 Digi-Key part# 450-1131-ND and similar Uxcell at ebay http://www.ebay.com/itm/281341546017?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT in lots of 10 around $4 -- inexpensive parts.
Also at Amazon https://www.amazon.com/uxcell%C2%AE-Momentary-Tactile-Button-Switch/dp/B00974Z6I6 and other dealers, Walmart online etc.

A strip of hobby wood or aluminum, which can be covered with tape, might work just as well, but has not been tried. Use whatever is easiest to obtain.

BumperX12.jpg
12 x 12 x 4.3 mm tactile button switch
BumperX12.jpg (13.38 KiB) Viewed 8770 times


wiring to existing bumper switches

Wires are first attached to the internal bumper switches and to the new bumper in final steps.
Open only the front end cover released by four screws in the bottom of the front, after removing the brush.
[edit] When putting the cover back on, note the channel for the handle on the dust bin on one side blocks the cover, so work that side on first, and open the opposite side first.

30awg wrapping wire was used here but needs the fine stripper on wrapping tools (though also burns off with the soldering iron). Any thin wire can be used.

BumperX7.JPG


BumperX8.jpg


Lift up the sensor board to rest vertical. One wide ribbon cable connector in the front must be pulled, pinching the locking lever on the rear. The bumper actuator holder is then unscrewed from the bottom of this board, to access the bumper switches. The micro switches are mounted in spring clips. Red wires from one side, white wires from the other, go to a single four pin connector on the board. It is easiest to solder onto the switch terminals by sliding up the heat shrink tubing covers. Stretch the opening with inserted pliers as needed.

[edit] On WiFi models the radio module in a vertical slot may get pulled out. Insure the cable passes in front when remounting, not split around stanchions. Caused an outage, maybe bad connector.

BumperX9.JPG


BumperX10.JPG


BumperX1.JPG


Wires emerge in the opening for the front bumper using a bit of tape to keep off the screw posts.
30awg wrapping wire was used, but requires the fine stripper in a wrap tool. Other thin wire can be used.

BumperX2.JPG


attaching external switches

The tact switches are fastened by inserting into cutouts in duck tape (stronger Gorilla brand used here).
Connect two switches with one inch spacing between the outside edges.

BumperX4.JPG


BumperX3.JPG


The waxy backing of self-stick mailing labels assists with handling duck tape.
1/4 in. cutouts in duck tape with corners slit out to 1/2 in. Tape grips the switch sides and forms a pretty strong fitting. Then cut the internal wires extended outside to about one inch. Support the switches on tape and solder to the wires. Clean the Powerbot sides with alcohol before attaching tape.

BumperX5.JPG


plastic bumper

The self-stick tape on the corner guard is removed, peeling the transparent glue tape off and cleaning with Goo-Gone and Alcohol.

The plastic piece is cut with scissors leaving 1/16 in. of the right angle corner guard retained over the straight portion. Cut a four inch piece for each bumper, about three inches straight section. Bend the curves in the remainder to fit. The back and front bend will assist in preventing the strip from being pulled off by contacts with furniture. The right angle goes along the top. The full 3/4 in. width is used. The front bumper widens around the side to one half inch. Note how the cover joint is different on the brush drive side compared to the other end. Alignment can be made along the cover joint line and the corner forward where the case opens for the front bumper side. The duck tape extends below the joint line, covering the joint.

If using common ABS plastic heat must be applied to bend. The vinyl corner guard bends cold.

The finished bumper adds 1/4 in. thickness to the side of the Powerbot, fairly close to the front bumper extension sideways. The activation force is similar to the front bumper, about 8 oz or 160gm (pressing with a postal scale).

Attaching Plastic to Buttons

Attach 1/4 in. square bits of thin double sided foam tape to buttons, cleaning with alcohol. Press for several seconds. The foam tape provides a spring function and relieves stress on the glue surface.
It is important the tape does not extend beyond the edge of the button so as not to block pressing the switch.
The button glue area is small but seems strong enough initially, as long as you do not mess with it. (See added additional tape support below). Only time will tell whether adequate. So far it has held up in a cleaning run, though there were no trapping type turns into furniture legs yet. They will occur eventually.

Note most glues will not stick to plastic -- if even then (something must make the bottles...). Epoxy, crazy glue, or polyurethane are needed. The surface is best made rough.
The double sided tape adds thickness to the buttons to allow pressing without the plastic actuator strip being stopped against the button top side.

Initial experiment used 3M automotive foam tape, presumably stronger than office type. The old roll on hand proved too thick, and did not hold well. To improve switched to 3M Command Adhesive tape, with the black wall -side onto the button and the red, fixture side onto the plastic. More important is adding a vertical retaining duck tape strip to limit the vertical swing of the plastic pressed at top or bottom, besides additional holding in place.
Note the special instructions which accompany 3M Command tape.

BumperX11.JPG


BumperX13.jpg


Cross strips secure the corners of the vertical tape against the vacuum housing with extra hold. A fine point is that the inside of the strip in the open area between the plastic and the vacuum needs to be covered to prevent sticking to the plastic as it is depressed and the tape folds.

performance

Excellent performance has been observed with good behavior responses, veering slightly off lamp bases touched etc. Just what was wanted, no radical change, just what it should be in the first place.

front bumper

The corner guard material can be used to extend the front bumper lower. See other post http://www.robotreviews.com/chat/viewtopic.php?p=138379#p138379
This may best be done only around the side corner, because of how the Powerbot climbs onto the dock. Examine the clearances involved there and see post discussion. A short section in the center might be lowered, not tried.
Last edited by glnc222 on October 21st, 2017, 7:05 pm, edited 27 times in total.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension Mod

Postby a1robotrepair » July 14th, 2016, 12:27 pm

Interested in your results.
Keep us posted.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension Mod

Postby glnc222 » July 14th, 2016, 9:14 pm

Revisions Added Above

The particular old roll of automotive tape proved not the best, too thick and flexible, and one side fell off.
Switched to 3M Command Adhesive tape and added a vertical retaining band and cross strips -- see main post.
Keeps the edge opposite a pressure point top or bottom from bending outwards, rotating too much. Exposed tape in the air gap best covered to prevent sticking to the plastic when folding as the strip is pushed inwards.

Image

[edit] Durability: the gorilla tape has held up over 200 runs and over a year of use. No connectors or fastenings were used to facilitate disassembly but the tape still works after a dozen removals and reattachment for other work on the insides (mag strip addition in the hacking forum). No new tape ever needed, comes off and on again nicely. Much better glue than regular duck tape.

testing bumper responses

On higher end models 9050 Copper and above, the spot following feature of the remote engages some navigation features, though limited. I think there are none on the manual guidance direction buttons. Response to the bumper was observed. On the front bumper though, head on near the side, the Powerbot kept backing up and repeating the same hit over and over, which I do not think occurs when cleaning. Testing with a stick planted opportunely to obstruct motion, including turns, towards the guide spot. The bot moves quickly and it can take some practice to keep up with it.

[edit]One way to get a handle on this is marking a starting point, say behind the bot, and a fixed point at an angle ahead. Start the bot in the pointing mode, with the remote button, with the spot on the marked point ahead and to the side. Then observe the path, and redo with a stick held at a point where the new bumper will engage it.
A backing off behavior can be observed. At least some prospect of avoiding the furniture leg traps is shown.

A second regular cleaning run showed some side hits on the problem lamp base without climbing onto it as before, but it was hard to tell whether it would have climbed this time, and was not just swiping past. The exact conditions needed for traps cannot be reproduced at will. The extra mounting tape makes the bumper quite sturdy now, so it is now ready for long term testing in regular, frequent use.

[edit] At one point cleaning it paused almost ten seconds, still running, with the side bumper pressed, then moved on. Like it was waiting for you to move your foot out of the way or something. Yet it works. Mysterious behavior in a major appliance.
Last edited by glnc222 on January 4th, 2018, 4:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension Mod

Postby glnc222 » July 19th, 2016, 1:41 pm

[edit] See later post below on Tilt Reduction Mod for this issue completed. These are sort of lab notes on work in progress.

One trap occurred against a square straight leg slightly lifting the side, with the side bumper engaged. How that lift is produced is not clear. The stall may happen before the bumper switched.
I will try repositioning the extra bumper lower on the side.
Previous observations show disabling the cliff sensors does not help.
Last edited by glnc222 on September 24th, 2017, 9:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension Mod

Postby glnc222 » July 19th, 2016, 4:37 pm

i am wondering if wheel torque in forward motion is involved in lifting the front when obstructed, as the reverse of the way the back flips up when going in reverse.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension Mod

Postby glnc222 » July 19th, 2016, 9:10 pm

furniture leg trap mechanics

Running under manual direction buttons on a stationary test stand rig reveals the suspension has sensors for extension of the wheels.
When the cliff sensors are not covered, and the bot elevated, it will run backwards under manual forward button, to back off a perceived cliff.
With cliff sensors covered, it will not start forward if a wheel is extended (as though that side is lifted).
Mounted on blocks to depress the wheels in, as though flat on the floor, it will run forward.

The trap against chair legs appears to be due to a wheel extension as the side is lifted sufficiently. It can still run on partial lifts. Covering cliff sensors showed no role of those detectors.

There could be more leverage on the wheel torque effect when the obstacle is closer to the wheel hub than contacts in the front, which show no elevation on impacts.
A bumper contact is needed before the side is stopped and levered up to extend the wheels.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension Mod

Postby glnc222 » July 19th, 2016, 9:38 pm

In view of the wheel extension sensor, the "tilt limiting mod" restricting extension may be useful:
http://www.robotreviews.com/chat/viewtopic.php?p=135343#p135343
This mod was needed separately to prevent the rear end pressing against the bottoms of cabinets.
A more permanent version with metal fittings screwed into the case may be in order, will see.
The tape tends to slip over time and needs to be tightened up.
A similar mod had been necessary on Neato robots with similar rear pivot wheel suspensions.
Moving backwards, the wheel torque turns the suspension arm lifting the back.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension Mod

Postby glnc222 » July 20th, 2016, 5:32 pm

Tilt Reduction Mod

An initial tilt reduction with tape only did not reduce enough, allowing the wheel extension sensor to trip when the Powerbot side lifts against furniture legs, causing a halt. A small piece of wood or plastic works more thoroughly.

The new 9350 Turbo model adds counter weights in the front to likely correct this problem.
A 9051 updated the 9050 in 2016, with no spec change; maybe it was for adding the counter weights, unknown.
Holding a flashlight against the corner of the front smoke plastic allows any large raised structures added at the sides to be seen. [edit] Apparently not enough for the problem, though, from later post by owner.

The tilt is caused by drive torque reaction (Newton's third law) similar to a motorcycle wheelie imitating a rearing horse. Also why a helicopter needs a rear propeller to counter spin from the main rotor.

[edit] Youtube video showing similar problem "Samsung Powerbot Stuck by Table Leg"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92ARzyDtISA
While the competing Vorwerk mentioned might navigate better, wall to wall carpet is shown similar to mine, on which I have four Vorwerk/Neato unable to navigate when the carpet is slick; the Samsung wheel treads are better, not to mention the larger 4 inch wheels of the 9000 series Powerbot. (Other mods were made on the Neato, adding a carpet slider underneath -- every robot so far seems to have imperfections needing user improvements.)

I believe this is what causes the traps against furniture legs. Only sometimes does the side lift enough to cause a trap, contributing to the random occurrence. (The cliff sensors are also involved and are here covered -- more below). [edit] As the cliff sensors trigger backing up instead of stalling, I could be wrong about this aspect as far as trapping goes. The traps take a lot of fiddling with manual guidance to reproduce.

Image

It happens against straight legs as well.

TiltMod6.JPG


Youtube report https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92ARzyDtISA

[edit]Another Youtube example https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WHYOvBTBdd8
Also https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=92ARzyDtISA&t=1s

Beware with this mod installed the wheels can be turned on when picking the robot up off the floor, and the start/stop button must be pressed -- unless the cliff sensors are covered. (And as it normally would run if picked up by the wheels instead of the case edge as warned in the manual, as the cliff sensors trigger reverse.)
It runs briefly then stops with an error; put down and press start to clear, stopped. (The system tries to return to the dock if moved off, supposedly a benefit.)

Because of excessive tilt flipping up the back moving in reverse, triggering the extension sensors, this also explains some traps reported bumping backwards into walls.

The extension sensor trips when the wheel rim flat part is about 1.25 in. below the outside edge of the circular fender part of the housing, when the bottom edge of the suspension arm is parallel with the bottom of the case.
The suspension arm here is kept depressed where the end point aligns with the case bottom, with the wheel rim about 1 in. below the fender edge.

The front of the Powerbot will be elevated at least two inches at this wheel extension so the cliff sensors will be tripped, so the cliff sensors must also be covered to prevent halting the bot. A deeper limit on extension could be made with different size materials and tape as used below.

The Powerbot can climb a threshold only 1/2 in high (3/4 in. on the new 9350 with flexing wheel treads), so the front need not be elevated any higher. A deeper extension limit will prevent the cliff sensors tripping when the side lifts up in contact with furniture legs. I do not have cliffs and just covered the sensors with paper masking tape. If I recall correctly when lifted only 3/4 in. in front the inside edge of the wheel tread or edge of the wheel proper, is aligned with the edge of the fender curve.
[edit] The 2016 9350 Turbo with "select a room" mapping, also has flexible wheel rims enabling traction for climbing and addition half centimeter threshold, according to the manual.

A thin piece of wood such as a section of hobby wood strips in craft stores or sawed from lumber, or some thick plastic, even cardboard, forms a block in the end of the wheel well, attached with double sided tape and duck tape (stronger Gorilla tape recommended). 3/32 in x 1/2 in Basswood was used here. It must be painted for a proper glue surface. Clean plastic surface with alcohol before attaching. [edit] The right angle plastic for the side bumper addition could also serve, though especially with a screw into the case.

Force on the block is less than the spring tension when on the floor, reduced by robot weight. The block is pressed only when the wheels are extended climbing etc. allowing it to last better.

[edit] The new 2017 smaller VR7000 models have a different bottom layout and need a different tape arrangement. See post 7000 thread http://www.robotreviews.com/chat/viewtopic.php?p=143764#p143764

TiltMod1.JPG


TiltMod2.JPG


TiltMod3.jpg


TiltMod4.jpg
TiltMod4.jpg (21.69 KiB) Viewed 7923 times


TiltMod5.jpg


Double sided scotch tape covers one side of the wood and extends slightly over the duck tape to secure it aligned with the wheel well wall. A thin strip of regular scotch tape is wrapped around below the wood for the same.
An additional duck tape cross piece on the case bottom helps old the wood piece in.

If it does not hold well I would make a tiny hole for a cut off brad or thumb tack under tape.
Tools for drilling without opening the case, fitting close to the wheel:
pinvise.JPG

Test drill size on some material for a tight pin fit. Wrap bit with several turns of tape to stop at a 1/4 in. depth.
Tape on the wood and drill through to mark spot then finish with wood removed.
Finished thumbtack fastening.
TiltMod7.JPG


While installing, tape down the wheels depressed fully with tape along the tread onto the case, for convenient work.

A longer wood piece would depress the wheel further but would need better double stick tape or epoxy glue, or definitely the thumb tack (smaller hole than a screw, easy to cover if needed).

Were the housing to be opened, the extension could be limited by mounting a rod, such as wood dowel or whatever, inside the spring tied to one end. It might also be possible to tie the arm down with a string, if suitable attachments are found, haven't looked. Opening the case is complicated with hidden screws etc. so I avoid it when possible. The exterior method can be more easily modified as needed.

[edit] The extension switch problem here is also a software defect -- unlikely to be improved the way the company works. The Neato robots have the same thing and trip the sensors all the time when running, when backing into walls, and they do not shut down the robot. Samsung seems to have programmed some sensitivity to these sensors which is unwarranted. There is something unique though in the side getting lifted when pressing into furniture legs, and tripping the cliff sensors as well. That can be solved only by limiting the wheel extension. It would take only a small change in the plastic molding of the wheel well to accomplish -- or adding a screw. I would not count on them doing anything, so it is up to the customers if they want this robot to run most effectively.

[edit] The 2017 smaller 7000 series had at least one report of a similar problem, noted in that thread. I reported the software defect on Samsung's own forum, where the moderator forwarded to the factory, for what good that does. The 7000 does have a better bumper extension down the side, though, from moving the brush forward making more room for the needed parts.

[edit] The neatest way to disable the wheel sensor is electrically, on the wiring inside. I think it is in the motor assembly. I would rather not open the rear case, though, being such a puzzle box, and risk damaging it. Basically the top finishing cover is pried off exposing screws. A service manual on a thumb drive is sold at SamsungParts.com with instructions, or there are some threads here, sketchy on the hidden screws and what not. Some people are just good at these things, technicians with experience on many devices.
Last edited by glnc222 on September 24th, 2017, 9:31 pm, edited 29 times in total.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension Mod

Postby glnc222 » July 21st, 2016, 2:44 am

Because the cliff sensors trigger backing up, covering them in the above treatment may not be necessary. It is the wheel extension sensor which triggers a stall. The purpose that behavior is not clear. Perhaps it is to prevent rubbing the wheel tread slipping on a surface causing wear. [edit] So it prevents the wheels turning when the bot is picked up, while the cliff sensors cause turning backwards to withdraw from a cliff. The software is wrong in not distinguishing whether the bot is running or in stopped mode.

Beware with this mod installed the wheels can be turned on when picking the robot up off the floor, and the start/stop button must be pressed -- unless the cliff sensors are covered.

The root cause of the lifting stalls might be the larger four inch wheels compared to three inch on Neato's. This might alter the wheel torque effect making it easier to flip up the front moving forwards. Just the friction of rubbing against the side can get transmitted through the torque effect into a lift, also easier when only one side is lifted. The weight distribution could also play a role, not forward heavy. Also the way the drive motor is positioned near the pivot of the suspension, creating the torque at the point with the greatest effect. Limiting the wheel extension would then be a necessary companion to using larger wheels. The larger wheels are an important improvement in the Powerbot allowing better travel on carpets.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension Mod

Postby glnc222 » July 21st, 2016, 9:41 pm

Samsung's mistake could be simply setting the wheel extension sensor at too small an extension. Were the sensor tripped only at the full extension instead of part way, the lifting effect on furniture might not trip it, while still sensing picking the robot up off the floor.

[edit] The manual advises not to lift the robot holding the wheels. This is so you do not depress the wheels releasing the extension sensor, allowing them to turn -- unless you want yourself vacuumed...

[edit] The 9350 Turbo WiFi model with room selection app seems to have responded to this problem by adding counter weights to the front, maintaining suspension balance in contact with furniture. A 9051 model updated the 9050 with no spec change, perhaps for the same addition, unknown.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby icepicknz » November 8th, 2016, 4:16 pm

So i have the 9350 Turbo WiFi model and have this same issue. A clean of the house it gets stuck 2 - 3 times on either the wall or the leg of a bed or something. I haven't even been able to complete a floor plan as it gets stuck every time i try and I've had the device for 2 weeks now.

Another issue I have which may be unrelated but the app crashes every time i try control my powerbot; perhaps their app doesn't like iPhone 7 plus so it just crashes ;/
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby glnc222 » November 8th, 2016, 4:48 pm

So are you just reviewing product or will you try fixing the wheel extension as shown? The bumper extension is only for certain lamp bases, speaker stands etc. on the floor, not furniture legs. Interesting the new counter weights may not be enough. I did notice the specified product weight does not seem much over the older models, so wither the added weight?

I've only used Android for their app. There seems to be a lot of problems with all vacuum WiFi apps given discussions. Software updates appear to be mainly fixes to the WiFi networking itself, protocols and such. Samsung phones are Android, so maybe more their specialty than Apple.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby icepicknz » November 8th, 2016, 4:59 pm

I bought the product after reading it did a good job, didn't see any posts or videos on it getting stuck till after the purchase. Overall I am happy with the product, but i do find the navigation of the unit to be quite bad, i.e. I have a 190 square meter house and it doesn't do all the rooms as it seems to miss many and run out of charge. Because i have to fix the lift issue, i'm wondering if this is why it's never doing the whole place, i.e. it may reset and redo areas it had already cleaned as it thinks its starting a fresh clean.

I will certainly try the tape idea posted here and I may need to purchase a android device to try the app on there rather than iOS

cheers
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby glnc222 » November 8th, 2016, 6:01 pm

The manual specifies that if it stops on an error, it begins the whole house over when restarting. This may be due to shutting down in case left unattended, to save the battery. Neato's had a tendency to over-discharge the battery left off the dock in such cases. One of many software deficiencies among all the vacuum robots in my experience, lack of refinement, sophistication.

Incidentally, if you leave the Powerbot off the dock, in half an hour it will go off by itself to find the dock. Don't leave on a table without turning off.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby glnc222 » November 8th, 2016, 11:22 pm

Don't rush to an Android device. Any general problem with iPhone would have been widely reported. What has been observed is that the server to which the SmartHome app connects over internet may not always be available, varied across countries. Especially relevant if the app has been setup and worked once.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby icepicknz » November 9th, 2016, 12:13 am

Yeah I tried my android device i use for my car tracking, unfortunately because its jailbroken it won't work even with root cloak and a few other things i tried. The app won't run on a jailbroken device.

My iPhone it loads the app just fine, but when i click on my smartbot (the front screen where it showed possible devices such as AC/TV, etc etc) then it shows the smart bot and then the app closes. Tried logout, tried to reinstall the app, tried rebooting device, nothing works :/
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby glnc222 » November 9th, 2016, 3:35 pm

The SmartHome app has error msgs for lots of conditions so something in that particular device would seem involved if the app closes prematurely. It usually tells you what it cannot do. There is a step where it loads a sub-app for the robot when selecting that appliance. Perhaps that step is where it crashes, loading that. Did you setup the robot properly to deliver the router password, using the remote, showing AP on the bot display? Phone must be close to the bot to insure connection. Swiping across the top of the main SmartHome screen shows a setup screen to connect new appliances. Some elaborate security systems in routers can also be a problem, where internet is restricted on the router for secure local networks. You would need a networking specialist.
On Android I used an Amazon Fire tablet lacking Google Play support which can be added in developer mode with a package online, just Google for it. Amazon just left out a bunch of OS support instead of completely changing it.
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Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby icepicknz » November 9th, 2016, 3:42 pm

Yes I went through the entire process and know it works as I was able to do a 'select and go' and was able to create 2 floor plans that were obviously very incomplete because of lifting on legs of furniture. When i click on the device from the front screen and it takes me to the device were i should be able to select "select and go" or manually drive the device this is where it crashes before i can select anything; it loads and i have enough time to read the screen (1-2seconds) and see battery level but it then just closes and crashes.

I have a fire with google play but its at my holiday home, i will wait till i go there and grab the device so i can test before investing more into this robot.
icepicknz
 
Posts: 5
Joined: November 8th, 2016, 4:14 pm

Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby icepicknz » November 9th, 2016, 3:42 pm

Yes I went through the entire process and know it works as I was able to do a 'select and go' and was able to create 2 floor plans that were obviously very incomplete because of lifting on legs of furniture. When i click on the device from the front screen and it takes me to the device were i should be able to select "select and go" or manually drive the device this is where it crashes before i can select anything; it loads and i have enough time to read the screen (1-2seconds) and see battery level but it then just closes and crashes.

I have a fire with google play but its at my holiday home, i will wait till i go there and grab the device so i can test before investing more into this robot.
icepicknz
 
Posts: 5
Joined: November 8th, 2016, 4:14 pm

Re: PowerBot Side Bumper Extension and Tilt Limiting Mods

Postby piokrza » November 9th, 2016, 3:45 pm

glnc222 you should work at Samsung engineer lab to help them improve their lame vacs lol
piokrza
Robot Master
 
Posts: 3475
Joined: May 18th, 2009, 8:17 am
Location: Poland

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